The Most Memorable Quotes From ‘Blow’

blow quotes: The knowing yet innocent face of Jean-Pierre Leaud, the 14-year-old star of The 400 Blows, is the heartbreaking core of Francois Truffaut’s most intimate film. As Antoine Doinel, Leaud begins his career as director Truffaut’s alter-ego, a young boy neglected by his mother and stepfather who, to cover his absence at school, tells a lie that leads him to run away from home and end up in reform school. There’s nothing remarkable or surprising about the plot; the power of this film comes from how completely it draws you into Antoine’s life. Antoine is a vivid, natural presence, one of the most compelling collaborations between a writer/director and an actor. The movie seems to capture him as he lives. Antoine endures his parent’s indifference, humiliations at school, deprivation and juvenile delinquency–yet the movie never feels pitying or condescending, as if it were trying to rub your nose in Antoine’s suffering. On the contrary: His resilience is what grabs you, his refusal to be broken down as he struggles towards a more adult understanding of the world. Truffaut and Leaud made many excellent films together (Day for Night, Two English Girls), including further chapters in Antoine’s life (Bed and Board, Stolen Kisses), but none were quite as simple, rich, and devastatingly potent as The 400 Blows. (The title, incidentally, refers not to abuse or anything sexual, but is a French idiom for a wild and unruly youth or “raising hell.”) –Bret Fetzer

George:
It was the greatest feeling I ever had. Followed abruptly by the worst feeling I ever had.

George:
So in the end, was it worth it? Jesus Christ. How irreparably changed my life has become. It’s always the last days of summer and I’ve been left out in the cold with no door to get back in. I’ll grant you I’ve had more than my share of poignant moments. Life passes most people by when they’re busy making grand plans for it. Throughout my lifetime I’ve left pieces of my heart here and there. And now, there’s almost barely enough to stay alive. But I force a smile, knowing that my ambition far exceeded my talent. There are no more white horses or pretty ladies at my door.

Fred Jung:
Sometimes you’re flush and sometimes you’re bust, and when you’re up, it’s never as good as it seems, and when you’re down, you never think you’ll be up again. But life goes on.

Ermine Jung:
You think people don’t know you’re a drug dealer. Everyone knows, its no secret. Every time I go out I’m humiliated. So you go to jail. It’s for your own good. You need to straighten your life out. What are you looking at Mrs. Gracie, your son’s no prize.

Mirtha Jung:
We are broke, that is my f***ing problem and you are a f***ing spy. That’s right. Always spyin’ always judgin’. Everyone’s laughing in your face you f***ing p*ssy. You let Diego f*** you in the ass. Maybe because you like it, maybe because you’re a f***ing fagot. That’s what I think you are. I think you are really f***in him cause you’re not f***ing me. Why’s that? Why? Why don’t you f*** me anymore. Don’t you ever touch me again motherf***er. Don’t ever put your hands on me again, a**hole. Get your hands off me. He’s a fugitive and a f***ing cocaine dealer. He’s got a kilo in his trunk right now.

Mirtha Jung:
I’m divorcin’ you George. I am getting custody of Kristina. And when you get out next week, you’re gonna pay support and that’s the end of it. There is someone else. I did not think you would want to know but I wanted to tell you. Say something.

George:
What do you want me to say? I’m in prison. You should know you’re the one who put me in here.

Mirtha Jung:
I knew you would say something like that. Always thinkin’ about yourself.

George:
May the wind always be at your back and the sun upon your face.

Fred Jung:
And may the winds of destiny carry you aloft to dance with the stars.

Fred Jung:
Cheers Georgie.

George:
Cheers pop.

George:
Hello Dad. You know I remember a lifetime ago, when I was about 3 1/2 feet tall, weighing all of 60 pounds, but every inch your son. I remember those Saturday mornings going to work with my dad, we’d climb into that big green truck. I thought that truck… was the biggest truck in the universe pop. I remember how important the job we did was, how if it wasn’t for us, people would freeze to death. I thought you were the strongest man in the world. And remember those home videos when mom would dress up like Loretta Young, barbeques and football games, ice cream, playing with the Tuna. And when I left for California only to come home with the FBI chasing me, and that FBI agent Trout had to kneel down to put my boots on and you said, “That’s where you belong you son of a b*tch, puttin on Georgie’s boots.” That was a good one pop, you remember that. And remember that time when you told me that money wasn’t real. Well old man, I’m 42 years old, and I finally realize what you were trying to tell me, so many years ago. I finally understand. Your the best, pop, just wish I could have done more for you, wish we had more time. Anyway, may the wind always be at your back, and the sun always upon your face, and may the wings of destiny carry you aloft to dance with the stars. I love you Dad. Love George.

George:
So, what’d I tell ya, Derek?

Derek:
It’s great, but what am I supposed to do with it?

George:
Sell it.

Derek:
Jesus Christ, George, I don’t see you for two years and you show up on my doorstep with 110 pounds of blow.

George:
Just f***ing sell it, Derek.

Derek:
Okay, but it’s going to take me a year.

Derek:
36 hours, 36 hours, I can’t believe we got rid of it in 36 hours.

George:
I think it’s fair to say you underestimated the market, Derek.

Derek:
Right on. It’s going to take us longer to count it than it did to sell it.

George:
The official toxicity limit for humans is between one and one and half grams of cocaine depending on body weight. I was averaging five grams a day, maybe more. I snorted ten grams in ten minutes once. I guess I had a high tolerance.

George:
I was busted. Set up by the FBI and the DEA. That didn’t bother me. Set up by Kevin Dulli and Derek Forreal to save their own asses. That didn’t bother me. Sentenced to 60 years at Ottisville. That didn’t bother me. I’d broken a promise. Everything I love in my life goes away.

Fred Jung:
Money isn’t real, George. It doesn’t matter. It only seems like it does.

Young George:
Are you gonna tell Mom that?

Fred Jung:
Yeah, that’s gonna be a tricky one.

Diego Delgado:
How much time do you have?

George:
Oh, let’s see. Twenty-six months.

Diego Delgado:
Twenty-six months? For murder? I must meet your lawyer.

George:
Danbury wasn’t a prison, it was a crime school. I went in with a Bachelor of marijuana, came out with a Doctorate of cocaine.

Cesar Toban:
Do you have pictures of your kids?

Jack Stevens:
What?

Cesar Toban:
I need to see them. I’ll also need their names and the names of their schools. We are trusting you with millions of dollars of coke, Mr. Stevens. Without your children, there is no deal.

Pablo Escobar:
Our business here today is cocaine, yes?

George:
Si. Yes it is.

Pablo Escobar:
I need to find an Americano who I can trust. One with honor, intelligence . . .

George:
You need an Americano with balls, Senior Escobar.

Pablo Escobar:
Yes, and balls, Mr. George.

Diego Delgado:
Do you have a dream, George?

George:
Well, I would if I could get some f***ing sleep.

Mr. T:
I can’t feel my face… I mean, I can touch it, but I can’t feel it inside…

George:
This is Grade A 100% pure Columbian cocaine, ladies and gentlemen… Disco sh*t… Pure as the driven snow.

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